Delander Row Weeding and Spot Spraying Contractor

27 Delander Cres Moree NSW 2400

Tel: 02 6752 5031 Mob: 0427 657 055

UHF: Channel 13

General Liability Insurance OH&S Policy Managing Farm Safety - Cert No: 0823 Smart Train - Chemical Program Workers Compensation 4x4WD ATV 100 to 300 Litre Tanks Water Supply from Huge 8000L Transportable Tank 0823 Smart Train - Chemical Program For control of, boxthorn bush, mimosia bush, briar and weeds, timber thining around irrigation fields, channel banks, dam banks, paddocks, sheds, silos, stock yards, fence lines. 4x4WD ATV, 100 to 300 litre tanks, water supply from huge 8000L transportable tank

Reference: Primary industries agriculture Weeds are often classed in broad groups depending on their characteristics and impacts. The main groups of weeds are Noxious weeds Weeds of National Significance (WONS) and National Environmental Alert List Weeds. Many weeds can be classified in more than one of these groups. For example, blackberry can be classed as a noxious weed, environmental weed and agricultural weed, depending on its situation and is also listed as one of Australia's Weeds of National Significance (WONS).

Noxious Weeds Some serious weeds are required by law to be controlled by all landholders in an area. These are known as noxious weeds and the law that controls these in NSW is the Noxious Weeds Act 1993 . Weeds that are declared noxious are those weeds that have potential to cause harm to the community and individuals, can be controlled by reasonable means and most importantly, have the potential to spread within an area and to other areas. A weed is declared noxious because its control will provide a benefit to the community over and above the cost of implementing control programs. Many ‘bad' weeds do not meet the criteria for declaration. Noxious weeds will have limited distribution with the potential to become more widespread and will cause impact on agriculture, human health or the environment. In New South Wales the administration of noxious weed control is the responsibility of the Minister for Primary Industries under the Noxious Weeds Act 1993 . The Act is implemented and enforced by the Local Control Authority (LCA) for the area, usually local government. The Act imposes obligations on occupiers of land to control noxious weeds declared for their area.

There are five classes of noxious weeds identified in the Act (see Table 1). All Noxious Weeds in NSW are listed in the Noxious Weeds database . Table 1 Control classes of noxious weeds Control class Weed type Example control requirements Class 1 Plants that pose a potentially serious threat to primary production or the environment and are not present in the State or are present only to a limited extent. The plant must be eradicated from the land and the land must be kept free of the plant. The weeds are also "notifiable" and a range of restrictions on their sale and movement exist. Class 2 Plants that pose a potentially serious threat to primary production or the environment of a region to which the order applies and are not present in the region or are present only to a limited extent. The plant must be eradicated from the land and the land must be kept free of the plant.

The weeds are also "notifiable" and a range of restrictions on their sale and movement exist. Class 3 Plants that pose a potentially serious threat to primary production or the environment of a region to which the order applies, are not widely distributed in the area and are likely to spread in the area or to another area. The plant must be fully and continuously suppressed and destroyed.* Class 4 Plants that pose a potentially serious threat to primary production, the environment or human health, are widely distributed in an area to which the order applies and are likely to spread in the area or to another area. The growth and spread of the plant must be controlled according to the measures specified in a management plan published by the local control authority.* Class 5 Plants that are likely, by their sale or the sale of their seeds or movement within the State or an area of the State, to spread in the State or outside the State. There are no requirements to control existing plants of Class 5 weeds. However, the weeds are "notifiable" and a range of restrictions on their sale and movement exists.

What is a Weed Control Notice? A Weed Control Notice is a notice issued by a Local Control Authority (Council) to an occupier of land that has declared noxious weeds growing upon it. A Weed Control Notice is issued in accordance with Section 18 of the Noxious Weeds Act 1993 (the ‘Act’) if an occupier fails to meet their obligations to control noxious weeds as directed by Council. How can I avoid being issued a Weed Control Notice? Control infestations of declared noxious weeds on your property as required under the Act and as detailed by Council. If for some reason, you cannot meet your obligations in controlling the noxious weeds, you must advise the Weeds Officer at the time of inspection so that alternative arrangements can be made to control the weeds. If you are unsure of how to control the weeds, contact Council’s Weeds Officer, your local NSW Department of Primary Industries District Agronomist or a reputable weed spray contractor for advice. The worst thing you can do is to leave the matter until the last minute.

What if the noxious weeds on my land are so extensive that their control is beyond my financial capacity? Council appreciates the extent of weed infestations in certain areas of the Shire and the financial burden imposed on landholders when required to undertake full and immediate control. As such, Council’s Weeds Officers are available to assist with the formulation of staged Property Control Plans which provide you with achievable targets and timeframes. Contact your Weeds Officer to discuss your options. What if circumstances beyond my control have prevented me from undertaking the required control work? Prior to issuing a Weed Control Notice Council must issue a ‘Notice of Intent’ to issue the proposed notice in accordance with Section 18A of the Act. This notification gives the occupier an opportunity to detail in writing any extenuating circumstances that may have impeded their ability to undertake the required control work. Having received a written submission within the allocated timeframe, Council will consider the circumstances given and may allow an extension of time. In their written submission, the landholder should provide a detailed plan, indicating what control techniques will be utilised to control the weeds and in what timeframe. What should I do if I receive a Weed Control Notice? If you receive a Weed Control Notice you must control the specified noxious weeds by the date given in the notice. If circumstances absolutely out of your control prevent you from complying with the notice, you must contact Council before the due date. Where suitably justified, Council may at its discretion provide an extension of time. Alternatively, you can request Council to arrange for the noxious weeds to be controlled for you, at your expense. What if I don’t control the noxious weeds by the date on the Notice?

Before the expiry date on the Weed Control Notice, verbal or written notification will be given, advising that the property will be re-inspected. If, following the inspection, the noxious weeds have not been controlled as requested on the Notice you may be given an Infringement Notice of $200 for failing to comply with a Weed Control Notice, plus a re-inspection fee of $155 to cover Council costs for the re-inspection. Action will then be taken under Section 20 of the Noxious Weeds Act 1993 to control the weeds, involving further costs to the occupier. Note: The reinspection fee as detailed in this letter is current until 30.6.2010 If I pay the $355, will I still have to control the noxious weeds? Yes. Following the re-inspection, unless immediate action is taken to control the noxious weeds Council will commence steps to control the noxious weeds under Section 20 of the Noxious Weeds Act 1993. You will be liable for the full cost of control works. If necessary, Council may commence legal proceedings to recover costs of the control works. Alternatively, Council may prosecute under Section 12 or Section 19 of the Act rather than undertaking Section 20 Entry Work.

What if I choose not to pay the $355.00? The Infringement Processing Bureau will commence action to recover the $200 penalty, and Council will add the re-inspection fee of $155 as a charge on the land affected, and will seek recovery through normal debt recovery procedures. Is mowing or slashing weeds considered satisfactory control Mowing and slashing weeds may provide temporary relief from seeding if performed regularly enough, however is not considered satisfactory control unless specifically detailed on your inspection report or in a Property Control Plan approved by Council. Slashing or mowing, in general terms will not kill noxious weeds. In contrast, many plants will produce lower growing flowering tillers as a natural survival mechanism, making further control difficult. I don’t have the time to control my weeds – what can I do? Contact Delander Row Weeding. Where can I get more information? Contact your local Council